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Bringing the poor up to western standards of living is an admirable aspiration, but where do you get the extra resources and how long can you keep it up before the collapse comes?

Nov 22, 2014 at 9:14 PM | Unregistered CommenterEntropic man

Go on name one element or resource we have run out of.

Nov 23, 2014 at 9:35 AM | Registered CommenterBreath of Fresh Air

Christopher Booker gives more information on wind industry lies.

Nov 23, 2014 at 7:20 AM | Registered CommenterPhillip Bratby

Some light bed-side reading for all who wish to see the IPCC's own summary of the AR5 reports. Nice accumulation of cherry-picks, exaggerations, and hysteria for policy makers:


Final Synthesis Report of IPCC's AR5

Nov 23, 2014 at 6:44 AM | Registered CommenterSkiphil

sandyS on Nov 22, 2014 at 10:24 PM
Yes, an 'interesting piece', a bit like the Curate's Egg, though he does end up dismissing Climate Change as unreal, and predicting a better world. It makes a change! :)

He also explains the US/China agreement well and gives a simple description of the Physics of the troposphere. Can anyone vouch for this explanation?

However ........

I don't see, with so many currently without basic power and the highly technical nature of any solution how there will be drive to "inevitably reduce the demand for fossil fuels". I can imagine that demand may weaken, but my eyesight is not up to seeing it, yet!

"Thorium- and fusion-reactor developments are showing increasing promise of providing effectively unlimited cheap and clean energy within a few decades."
I know several countries are looking at Thorium but fusion? Oh, it does say "within a few decades", so we are back to a breakthrough in 40 years!

"Major advances in storage technology are also well underway and expected to become commercially available within a few years."
Does anyone have any idea what they are?

"Although climate itself is presenting its irrefutable opposing argument, failed prophets never willingly concede defeat until their mouths are stopped with the dust of reality. In this instance gob-stopping reality seems likely to take the form of severe winter weather leading to a widespread collapse of electrical power in an overloaded grid suffering from the underinvestment, malinvestment, restraints and neglect. All these stem from years of misguided climate policies."

I would say 'misguided energy policies' or 'non-existent energy policies' as we are talking about our energy infrastructure, though how anyone thinks that the Government's 'climate policy' is going to affect the climate is beyond me.

Nov 22, 2014 at 11:51 PM | Registered CommenterRobert Christopher

Interesting article linked at The Quadrant by biologist Walter Stack entitled The Climate Scam’s Meltdown

Nov 22, 2014 at 10:24 PM | Unregistered CommentersandyS

Entropic man
More than two (not counting this one)replies to that and it should be another discussion thread.

Nov 22, 2014 at 10:17 PM | Unregistered CommentersandyS

Barry Wood is

Bringing the poor up to western standards of living is an admirable aspiration, but where do you get the extra resources and how long can you keep it up before the collapse comes?

Nov 22, 2014 at 9:14 PM | Unregistered CommenterEntropic man

Yes, interesting post, Barry. Is Lynas really on his road to Damascus? I'll be cautious and wait a bit longer.

Nov 22, 2014 at 7:49 PM | Unregistered Commentermichael hart

Barry - it is good to see reality dawning on Mark Lynas wrt the benefits of fossil fuels in terms of poverty aleviation in the developing world. Perhaps your efforts and that excellent Lomberg quote have made him consider the bigger picture.

Nov 22, 2014 at 5:58 PM | Registered Commenterlapogus

If any sceptic disagrred with 350- like Mark Lynas does here, the would be called a climate denier - coal, india and the poort

“There is a very good reason why hurricanes of an equivalent ferocity kill thousands in a country like Myanmar or Haiti, but only a few dozen at most in the US or Australia. To be poor is to be vulnerable, even in today’s climate. The fact that only ‘climate sceptics’ tend make this point currently is somewhat shameful.”

- See more at: http://www.marklynas.org/2014/11/indias-coal-conundrum-which-comes-first-the-climate-or-the-poor/#sthash.2LQxuuYl.dpuf

more context:

Lynas:

"Climate campaigners 350.org recently had an ‘India Beyond Coal’ day of action, supported by assertions such as this:

'Our excessive dependence on coal threatens a future where we can pull millions of Indians out of poverty. Rising costs of coal, reduced availability, excessive deforestation, negative health impacts and the climate crisis are strong reasons to begin the transition towards renewable energy and energy efficiency.' - 350

Lynas:
I really don’t think this is true. The costs of poverty – which includes millions of preventable deaths of young children, lack of access to water and sanitation, reduced livelihood prospects, large-scale hunger and malnutrition, and so on… are clearly much greater than the direct costs of coal burning, and this equation probably still holds even when the future damages from climate change are factored in.

The proof of this is right on India’s border in the shape of China’s coal-based development miracle. China has lifted hundreds of millions of people out of poverty in recent decades, and made such immense strides in its development index that it alone has helped the world achieve most Millennium Development Goals – all based on a manufacturing boom almost entirely fuelled by coal.

Indeed, I would go so far as to suggest that the best way for poorer countries to protect themselves against future climate change might not be to reduce their emissions, but to use as much energy as possible – including from coal – in order to develop richer and more resilient societies. There is a very good reason why hurricanes of an equivalent ferocity kill thousands in a country like Myanmar or Haiti, but only a few dozen at most in the US or Australia.

To be poor is to be vulnerable, even in today’s climate. The fact that only ‘climate sceptics’ tend make this point currently is somewhat shameful. -

See more at: http://www.marklynas.org/2014/11/indias-coal-conundrum-which-comes-first-the-climate-or-the-poor/#sthash.2LQxuuYl.dpuf

Nov 22, 2014 at 1:50 PM | Unregistered CommenterBarry Woods

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