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Discussion > Brexit, Doom ..... or Boom ?

MAU,

Greg Clarke is another good reason to never vote Tory again.

May 14, 2019 at 1:53 PM | Unregistered CommenterCharly

Business Briefing, BBC News Channel, 28 March 2019: Finding by the Executive Complaints Unit
Complaint
The programme included an interview with Tim Martin, Chairman of Wetherspoon, who was described by the presenter as a business leader “who wants a clean break from the EU”. Two viewers complained that the interview was not conducted in a properly impartial manner, with Mr Martin being persistently interrupted by the presenter.
Outcome
In the ECU’s judgement, it would have been easy for viewers to form the impression that the presenter held a distinct view of her own on Mr Martin’s support for leaving the EU without a deal, and the interview fell short of the BBC’s standards of due impartiality in that respect.
Upheld
Further action
It has been stressed to the presenter that the way questions are framed should make it clear to the audience that this is for the proper purpose of impartial challenge and that a personal view is not being expressed.

Jun 30, 2019 at 12:41 PM | Registered Commenterstewgreen

ProjectFear round 5:24 The UK will run out of fuel
"Brexit: No-deal plan threatens UK fuel plants"

"The concern, which is shared by both the Scottish and Welsh governments, relates to the UK government's decision not to apply tariffs - taxes on trade - to imports of petrol in the event of a no-deal Brexit.
The decision was made to lessen the inflationary impact on prices in the event of a no-deal Brexit.
The current tariff on fuel imports from non-EU countries is 4.7%.
However, under World Trade Organization (WTO) rules, a zero tariff rate must apply to petrol imports from all countries, opening up the UK to Russian fuel imports.
blah blah
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-49405270


#0 Now if the £ goes down 5% then the status quo is restored .
======================

1. The tariff will come off petrol and diesel so we will be flooded with cheap fuel from beyond the EU. Consequently our refineries won’t be able to compete so they will close and thousands of jobs will be lost.
2. Because we no longer have any refineries we won’t have any petrol or diesel. St. Greta will award us a gold star.

Of course states 1 and 2 are unlikely to co-exist. That is usually the case when one sets out to evaluate extreme possibilities, the final outcome can’t be at all the fringes, it must be somewhere in between. Don’t worry though because the whole point of risk assessment is to indentify potential problems and make sure they don’t become real.

Aug 20, 2019 at 9:59 PM | Registered Commenterstewgreen

The main point is the 4.7% tariff is not on the RETAIL price
It's on the untaxed price ..which is about 30p per litre which is then increased by taxes and retail costs to £1.20
So the EU base price is 30p per litre
and the world tariff free price is 28.5p

Aug 21, 2019 at 11:00 AM | Registered Commenterstewgreen

How various EU countries have fared under the EU

In the 46 years Denmark has been a member of the bloc it’s economy has fallen in the world rankings from #20 to #36.

In the 24 years Finland has been a member of the bloc it’s economy has fallen in the world rankings from #32 to #42.

In the 6 years Croatia has been a member of the bloc it’s economy has fallen in the world rankings from #67 to #75.

In the 12 years Romania has been a member of the bloc it’s economy has fallen in the world rankings from #38 to #46.

In the 33 years Portugal has been a member of the bloc it’s economy has fallen in the world rankings from #36 to #47.

In the 15 years Hungary has been a member of the bloc it’s economy has fallen in the world rankings from #49 to #55.

In the 15 years Latvia has been a member of the bloc it’s economy has fallen in the world rankings from #88 to #96.

In the 15 years Lithuania has been a member of the bloc it’s economy has fallen in the world rankings from #74 to #82.

In the 15 years Estonia has been a member of the bloc it’s economy has fallen in the world rankings from #93 to #98.

In the 38 years Greece has been a member of the bloc it’s economy has fallen in the world rankings from #30 to #50.

In the 12 years Bulgaria has been a member of the bloc it’s economy has fallen in the world rankings from #70 to #74.

Where is the economic argument for membership?

When is it going to start existing?

Aug 21, 2019 at 1:49 PM | Unregistered CommenterMuppets are us

Rogers and other British experts were strangely unimpressed by the powerful practical levers their own side disposed of. Britain was the largest importer of cars from Germany. It had a trade deficit with most countries on the continent, which meant that any breakdown in talks would idle more European factories than British ones. It was, with France, one of only two serious military powers in Western Europe. It had an intelligence-gathering relationship with the United States that continental Europe was desperate to preserve the benefits of. It contained 40% of Europe’s data servers. It was due to recover its own rich fishing banks—schools of mackerel north of Scotland, beds of prawns southwest of Cornwall—where E.U. vessels took 59% of the haul. And it was the financial capital of the world. The E.U. would have no choice but to do business with an independent Britain

Aug 22, 2019 at 1:59 AM | Unregistered Commenterclipe