Nov 19, 2006
Bishop Hill

Natalie Solent hits the nail right on the head on the subject of the Dutch burqa ban.

The burqa is obviously bad. Where it is not oppressive it is arrogant. The situation ought to be
- you want to wear it in the street? OK, if you must.
- you want to wear it in my shopping centre? Sorry, against company policy. OR Welcome inside. Depends on the company.
- you want to wear it in an airport? Ha ha, most amusing madam. This nice gentleman will now escort you to the exit.

But as she points out, we must not accept that the state has a right to dictate what clothes we wear. If they can enforce that, they can enforce pretty well anything. Burqas may be offensive and a crime against fashion, but hey, so is wearing greying y-fronts and most members of parliament (except perhaps Chris Bryant MP, a man who is proud of his kacks) are probably guilty of that particular sin.

I'm probably not the first to say it, but illiberalism usually breeds more illiberalism.  Civil society would, if unhindered, deal with burqa-clad agents provocateur by shunning them and refusing them access to shops and jobs. But this is impossible because of the morass of legislation making this sort of gentle pressure illegal.  Liberals need to recognise just how illiberal the race relations legislation is. What on earth do those on the left think that freedom of association means if not the right to choose who you associate with? Deprived by this illiberal legislation of a response to the burqa brigade, we now have the crazy situation where we have to suffer the removal of yet more of our liberties - which is precisely what the Islamists want.

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